Which structural damage might be expected if a Category 1 hurricane is predicted to hit an area?

A Category 1 hurricane is a dangerous storm that is likely to cause some damage to roofs, gutters, and siding. Winds could topple trees and snap tree branches. Winds could also affect power lines and poles, resulting in power outages.

What does it mean if a hurricane is Category 1?

Category One Hurricane. Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled.

Can a Category 1 hurricane break windows?

Storm Damage from Debris

Even in Category 1 storms, sustained winds can reach speeds more than 90 miles per hour, uprooting trees and services. Branches, limbs, and other loose objects then become missiles which can easily shatter even the most-robust of traditional windows.

Is a Category 1 hurricane worse than a Category 5?

To be classified as a hurricane, a tropical cyclone must have one-minute-average maximum sustained winds at 10 m above the surface of at least 74 mph (Category 1). The highest classification in the scale, Category 5, consists of storms with sustained winds of at least 157 mph.

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Is a hurricane category 1 bad?

A Category 1 hurricane is a dangerous storm that is likely to cause some damage to roofs, gutters, and siding. Winds could topple trees and snap tree branches. Winds could also affect power lines and poles, resulting in power outages.

Is a level 1 hurricane bad?

Hurricane with sustained wind speeds of 74 mph to 95 mph are classified as Category 1 strength. Category 1 hurricanes can cause damage to unanchored mobile homes and signs. … Trees can also be severely damaged by Category 1 hurricane winds, with large branches breaking and some trees being completely uprooted.

What is worse Category 1 or 2 hurricane?

Category 1: Winds 74 to 95 mph, which will usually produce minor damage, including to trees and power lines. Category 2: Winds 96 to 110 mph, that could result in extensive damage, uprooting trees, breaking windows, and snapping power lines.

What does a Category 1 hurricane look like?

Category 1 (74-95 mph winds)

Category 1 is the lowest category, but it’s still a whopper of a storm. You may have roof and siding damage. Large branches will break from older trees, and power outages will occur for a few or several days.

What is the storm surge of a category 1 hurricane?

hurricanes: • Category 1—Winds 74–95 mph, storm surge 4–5 feet, minimal damage to plants and signs. Category 2—Winds 96–110 mph, storm surge 6–8 feet, some flooding, minimal damage to mobile homes, roofs, and small crafts.

Should I be scared of a Category 1 hurricane?

While a Category 1 or 2 hurricane might not seem as threatening, these storms can still be extremely dangerous and safety measures should be taken. Sustained winds between 74-95 mph. You can expect power outages that could last up to several days following extensive damage to power lines and poles.

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What kind of damage can happen in a Category 5 hurricane?

Category 5 Hurricane: catastrophic damage will occur

Hurricanes in the highest hurricane category cause near total destruction. A large number of homes and buildings will be completely destroyed. Areas hit by this level of hurricane will lack power and water and be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

What is a Category 7 hurricane?

A Category 7 is a hypothetical rating beyond the maximum rating of Category 5. A storm of this magnitude would most likely have winds between 215 and 245 mph, with a minimum pressure between 820-845 millibars. The storm could likely have a large wind field and a small eye.

What are the damages of a hurricane?

These hazards include heavy rains, high winds, a storm surge, and even tornadoes. Storm surge pushes seawater on shore during a hurricane, flooding towns near the coast. Heavy rains cause flooding in inland places as well.

What determines hurricane category?

It turns out, a hurricane’s category is only based on one thing: wind speed. According to the National Hurricane Center’s website, the agency relies on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale to determine a storm’s strength. … Once wind speeds in the system reach 74 mph, it becomes a hurricane.